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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


Big Picture San Diego Blog

November 17, 2017

In 2016, executives from San Diego life sciences giants Illumina, Human Longevity, Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific, ResMed and Dexcom approached EDC with a pressing need for a specific type of talent: bioinformatics professionals. Known among peers by their technical title, bioinformaticians develop and apply software tools to understand biological data sets. In San Diego, leaders in genomics and connected health are gathering incomprehensible amounts of data with the power to unlock the human genome, make personalized care a reality and enhance the way we live on a massive scale. Individuals skilled in bioinformatics, data science and computational biology are instrumental in deciphering such data sets – a task with stunning implications across pharma, biotech, healthcare, genomics and much more.

Even with impressive programs at UC San Diego and SDSU, the demand for bioinformatics professionals is simply too high for local universities to fill. As such, EDC launched the Life Sciences Trek to San Diego with the help of our economic development committee, to showcase local opportunities for Masters and PhD’s from across the country. The goal of the program: attract talent who can translate data into actionable results for application in healthcare and medicine. During the trek, the group would visit seven San Diego life sciences staples, presenting a range of career opportunities.

On November 9-10, we were joined by 27 students from across the U.S., representing UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco, University of Michigan, Stanford, Arizona State, UC Riverside, University of Northern Carolina, University of Pittsburgh and Georgia Institute of Technology. Through company tours, presentations and a networking reception, students gained access to influential researchers and executives across many of San Diego's research institutions and fast growing companies including ResMed, Illumina, the Salk Institute, Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Human Longevity, Inc. From drug discovery to connected devices, genetic sequencing to direct patient care, the breadth of opportunities for bioinformaticians became apparent within San Diego’s diverse life sciences ecosystem.

Though a pilot program for EDC, the Life Sciences Trek to San Diego was largely a success. Providing an employer perspective, ResMed Lead Talent Acquisition Partner Amy Hernandez considered the trek a “fantastic employment branding opportunity” and a “great community event that highlighted San Diego as an attractive employment marketplace to a ripe generation of future leaders.” Additionally, the students were impressed. For one student, the trek displayed “tremendous opportunities to do biomedical research that directly impacts patient lives.” For another, the trek was a “fantastic opportunity and unique experience to get an inside look into companies and a career in Life sciences and in bioinformatics specifically,” saying “it was perfect timing in my last year of my PhD program.”

Looking ahead to 2018, EDC will continue to address the occupational demand for bioinformatics and other life sciences professionals in San Diego. EDC will play host second trek in 2018, and will emphasize the need for data science professionals as a part of the U.S. Chamber’s Talent Pipeline Management program, which takes an employer-focused approach to meeting talent needs.

EDC didn’t need to write talking points, as San Diego spoke for itself. The people we met, spaces we visited and stories we heard over the two days embodied the region’s life-changing identity. Surpassing expectation, the trek has left an undeniable impression on all who participated – students and locals alike.

See more at #SDLifeSciencesTrek.


 

November 17, 2017

Understanding our economy begins with strong data. Lucky for us, November means lots of it. 
 
A little about the research products released this week:
 

Economic Snapshot: San Diego added 16,100 jobs year-over-year

Following an increase in employment during Q2 2017, total nonfarm employment fell 5,800, or 0.4 percent, in Q3. Job gains in the private sector helped offset some of the losses seen in local and state government. Compared to a year ago, total nonfarm employment was up 16,100, or 1.1 percent. Meanwhile, San Diego’s unemployment rate declined by 0.2 percentage points in Q3, and remained 0.6 percentage points below California’s rate and was on par with the national rate.

Key findings from the snapshot:

  • San Diego closed Q3 with an unemployment rate of 4.1 percent, the 17th lowest among top U.S. metros and below the state rate of 4.7 percent.
  • With the holiday season approaching, retail trade recorded the largest gain, adding 1,400 jobs during the quarter. Healthcare and social assistance continued to grow, adding 1,200 jobs.
  • VC dollars in the region increased 25.1 percent compared to the previous quarter.

The Quarterly Economic Snapshot analyzes key economic indicators that are important to understanding the regional economy and the region’s standing relative to the 25 most populous metropolitan areas in the U.S. This releases includes data from July to September (Q3) 2017.

 

Economic Pulse:

Each month the California Employment Development Department (EDD) releases industry data for the prior month. This edition of San Diego’s Economic Pulse covers October 2017 data, including unemployment, new business establishments and job postings.

Key Findings from pulse:

  • The region’s unemployment rate fell to 3.7 percent in October, from a revised 4.1 percent in September, and is a full percentage point below the October 2016 rate of 4.7 percent.
  • Nearly every jurisdiction in San Diego saw a decline in unemployment. Imperial Beach saw the largest decline for a second consecutive month.
  • Year-over-year, real estate, rental and leasing growth outpaced all other sectors, up 5.6 percent.

 

November 8, 2017

"Why San Diego leaders must forge international economic partnerships" was originally published in the San Diego Union-Tribune, authored by Nikia Clarke.
 
Did you know that the greatest public transportation systems in the world have a direct and important connection to San Diego? The ticketing systems for London, Chicago, Vancouver and Sydney have all been enhanced and modernized through the technologies of San Diego-based Cubic Transportation Systems. And joining this global lineup will be New York City following a $533 million contract awarded to Cubic on October 25, taking The Big Apple to the next level in modern transit payment.
 
This is just one of the many remarkable ways San Diego companies are connecting abroad to create jobs and opportunities here at home. World Trade Center San Diego — an affiliate of San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation — in conjunction with Congressman Scott Peters, led a delegation of San Diego companies and organizations to London and Cambridge, U.K. last week to strengthen economic ties with one of our region’s top markets for trade and investment......
 
Read the full op-ed here.
October 20, 2017

Strengthening ties between San Diego and the U.K., Congressman Scott Peters (CA-52) and World Trade Center San Diego led a delegation to London and Cambridge, United Kingdom from October 16 – 19. Check out #SDinUK for the inside scoop.

Rep. Peters and World Trade Center San Diego were joined by more than two dozen San Diego delegates from Cubic Transportation Systems, Qualcomm, San Diego Gas & Electric, Edico Genome, Takeda California, NuVasive, Forge Therapeutics, BioMed Realty, Alexandria Real Estate, Biocom, UC San Diego, San Diego State University and others. 

Over the course of the three-day trade mission, two significant announcements, representing both the smart cities and life sciences space, were made.

San Diego became the first west coast city to enter London’s Business Welcome Programme. As part of the agreement inked between World Trade Center San Diego and London & Partners, London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s official economic development and tourism agency, London-based companies will have access to up to three months of free space at WeWork San Diego, as well as a suite of other services designed to accelerate their ability to grow in San Diego.

Continually, San Diego-based Forge Therapeutics announced the launch of BLACKSMITH, a new platform being developed in partnership with Evotec AG’s U.K. team. With more than 23,000 people dying in the U.S. annually due to resistance to anti-biotic superbugs, Forge’s new platform will aid in bringing lifesaving drugs to the market. The partnership will also enable Forge to create additional jobs in San Diego.

Additionally, Rep. Scott Peters and the delegation met with and spotlighted the following companies and held additional meetings and panels to expand on the following topics:

  • San Diego-based Cubic Transportation Systems (CTS) and its partnership with Transport for London (TfL). During this event, leaders heard from CTS’ president Matt Cole and TfL’s CTO Shashi Verma on how the collaboration moves millions of people across London daily.
  • An MOU signing between Biocom and OneNucleus, both trade organizations that represent the life sciences sector in their respective locations, to strengthen partnerships.
  • A conversation about leveraging electric vehicle technology as a key platform for smart cities in the U.K. with Qualcomm and SDG&E. During the panel, it was announced that Chargemaster, a licensee of Qualcomm’s wireless electric vehicle charging technology, has just opened the world’s first EV Experience Centre in Milton Keynes in the U.K. and is looking to expand elsewhere around the world.
  • A partnership agreement in Cambridge for a ground-up development project by San Diego-based BioMed Realty, comprising 100,000 square feet of laboratory and office space for growing life sciences companies. The partnership launch was attended by newly-elected Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Mayor James Palmer.
  • A tour and best practices exchange with Knowledge Quarter, a one mile area of London comprised of eight higher education institutions, 22 museums and galleries, 34 libraries and archives, 580 research centers, 3,000 scientists, 13,700 academics, 57,000 staff and 98,500 students. Knowledge Quarter is home to companies including The British Library, Google, The Guardian, University of London and others.
  • San Diego-based Edico Genome and a partnership with U.K.-based Congenica. Simultaneously, Edico Genome, in partnership with Amazon Web Services and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, set a GUINNESS WORLD RECORD title for “Fastest time to analyze 1,000 human genomes.” The award was presented at the American Society of Human Genetics 2017 Annual Meeting in Orlando.

The U.K. is one of San Diego’s most vital trading partners. U.K.-based companies directly support more than 10,000 local jobs and have poured more than $3.9 billion in greenfield investment (2003-2015) into San Diego’s economy. The U.K. is also one of the top 10 largest export markets for San Diego-produced goods and services.

The trade mission was organized by WTC San Diego, with assistance and support provided by the U.K. Department of International Trade.

October 20, 2017
Each month the California Employment Development Department (EDD) releases industry data for the prior month. This edition of San Diego’s Economic Pulse covers September 2017 data, including unemployment, new business establishments and job postings.
 
Highlights include:
  • The region’s unemployment rate fell to 4.1 percent in September from a revised 4.7 percent in August, and is below the September 2016 rate of 4.6 percent.
  • Every jurisdiction in San Diego experienced a decline in its unemployment rate. The largest drops occurred in the cities of El Cajon and Imperial Beach.
  • The labor force grew in September, for the fourth consecutive month, adding 8,600 workers. 
  • Year-over-year, real estate, rental and leasing job growth outpaced all other sectors, up 7.9 percent.
 
Read San Diego's Economic Pulse here.
October 16, 2017

Announced during a World Trade Center San Diego-led trade mission to the U.K., San Diego has officially become the first west coast city to join London’s city-to-city Business Welcome Programme.  The partnership program offers direct services and support required to scale San Diego and London-based companies looking to set up locations and do business in the partner’s metro area. This means that it will be much easier for San Diego companies to do business in London, accelerating company growth, trade and investment within both regions. 

At a time of shifting political ideologies and global uncertainty, trade partnerships help bring down borders,” said Nikia Clarke, executive director of World Trade Center San Diego. “San Diego and London have taken their success into their own hands and partnered on the City-to-City Business Welcome Programme to ensure continued economic progress.

In case you didn’t know, the U.K. is a vital trading partner for San Diego:

  • U.K.-based companies directly support more than 10,000 jobs
  • U.K. companies have poured more than $3.9B in greenfield investment (2003-2015) into San Diego’s economy
  • The U.K. is one of the top 10 largest export markets for San Diego-produced goods and services

As part of the official agreement between World Trade Center San Diego (WTC San Diego) and London & Partners, companies will have access to a suite of services. London-based companies looking to open shop in San Diego and vice versa can access reduced co-working spaces, legal consulting and access to a venture capital network and angels, facilitated by WTC San Diego.

SAN DIEGO TO LONDON LONDON TO SAN DIEGO
  • 1 month of free office space
  • Discounted Oyster card
  • Discounted accommodations
  • 3 months of free space at
    WeWork San Diego
  • Reserved spots in
    CONNECT’s Springboard
    and Capital Match Program
  • Access to discounted attractions

 

London & Partners, which acts as London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s official promotional agency for both business and tourism, launched the program in March 2017 to build a global network of cities that are collaborating to help businesses transition and grow from one destination to another. With this announcement, San Diego has become the first west coast city to enter the program. Other global cities in the program include Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam, Lisbon and many others pending agreement.

“London and San Diego are two cities that share a strong culture of business and innovation. We see a great opportunity to work with San Diego to establish greater trade and investment links and to help high-flying companies maximise the opportunities on both sides of the pond," said Tony Margiotta, project manager, city-to-city, London & Partners.  "The city-to-city Business Welcome programme is already helping businesses in cities all over the world to build their networks and expand internationally. We look forward to helping more San Diego companies make London their launchpad for growth into Europe and beyond.”

The announcement was made as part of trade mission, led by World Trade Center San Diego and Congressman Scott Peters (CA-52), to London and Cambridge from Oct. 16 -19. More than 20 senior level San Diego executives representing business, academia and government will be in the U.K. spur economic activity by creating new partnerships and opportunities. 

London businesses interested in setting up shop in San Diego can visit here to learn more.

San Diego businesses looking to tap into London’s network can learn more here or contact Jesse Gipe at jg@sandiegobusiness.org.

October 11, 2017

Last week, thousands of MFG Day events were held across the country to celebrate modern manufacturing. In San Diego, more than 50 companies participated in events - from facility tours to regional resource fairs - to showcase a wide range of job opportunities. This included a private tour of Samsung’s maquiladora in Tijuana, which employs upwards of 6,000 workers, alongside Rep. Susan Davis and more than 20 EDC partners. Fun fact: San Diego’s MFG day is one of the only bi-national celebrations in the country. The week culminated at EDC’s annual breakfast event, attended by more than 200 local business and civic leaders.

The goal of MFG day is to change public perception of the sector, and introduce people to manufacturing careers. Even though San Diego has a smaller concentration of manufacturing employment than the national average, the region is home to nearly 110,000 manufacturing jobs, spread across more than 300 industries1. These are not just team assembler and machinist roles; there are hundreds of unique occupations from finance to marketing to engineering. And these are good paying jobs. In 2016, the average annual salary exceeded $79,000 in San Diego2.

Dismissiveness toward manufacturing comes from a track record of employment declines that began well before the Great Recession, in large part due to increases in automation. However, with a focus on advanced manufacturing, San Diego has fared much better. Since 2007, when the recession began, manufacturing employment declined 11.2 percent nationwide. During that same time, manufacturing in San Diego grew 3.2 percent, adding more than 3,400 jobs3.

This is because manufacturing in San Diego is driven by the innovation economy that makes aircrafts, medical equipment and semiconductors. Of course, there are also apparel makers, plastic producers and world-famous breweries. But the top eight manufacturing industries, accounting for more than 61,000 manufacturing jobs, are all in advanced industries such as aerospace and biotech4.  

Strategic development of San Diego's defense and life science clusters, as well as the strong partnership with Baja California, has helped the region’s manufacturing sector remain relevant and competitive.

1-4EMSI 2017.3.

September 29, 2017

Last week, members of the EDC team joined 20 board members, investors and partners on a trip to Louisville, Kentucky. The purpose was to learn about that city’s emphasis on inclusion and compassion as focal points for their branding and economic development efforts. We met passionate people—both in the private and public sectors—who are working hard to create a community that is uniquely Louisville.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer set the tone when he welcomed our group Wednesday evening and stayed to talk with us about Louisville’s past, its present challenges and the city’s goals around lifelong learning, health and compassion. Louisville’s challenges are significant, but they do not shy away from talking about them openly. And there is a genuine continuity to how people raise, speak about and confront these issues.

Research and workforce representatives presented hard-hitting data on the region’s existing economic disparities, as well as ambitions to add 55,000 degrees over a ten year span. The city’s economic development team and business leaders explained how the region has to work harder than most to attract and retain talent, and showcase their region as a place that is ripe for investment and growth—despite having 30,000 current job openings and being among the most affordable of large metros.

Many of the challenges that they face today stem from events that happened generations ago. But they embrace their past with the belief that they can’t chart where they are going if they ignore where they have been. Addressing a history of racial segregation, poverty and stagnant population growth are as much a part of their economic development discussion and focus as attraction, retention and expansion. The authenticity that was threaded throughout our visit culminated in an honest dialogue among our delegation.

San Diego’s Story

Back home, San Diego has experienced solid economic growth, led by its innovation industries, which have added jobs three times faster the overall economy1. However, this prosperity has not been shared by all San Diegans. A recent study found that there are more than one million people in our region with incomes too low to afford basic costs of living—the numbers are even more appalling for our black and Latino populations.

In San Diego Latinos represent one-third of the population, and are projected to be the majority by 20302. Yet only 17 percent have completed a bachelor’s degree program or higher3. Meanwhile our region has a deficit of 4,500 STEM graduates4. But talent shortages exist in every metro area—our population is our talent pool.

And while we have large employers in our region that are the vanguard of innovation, 59 percent of our workforce is employed by smaller firms that often pay below average wages5. Layer on the fact that San Diego has the second highest median home price and is the fourth most expensive metro to live in6, and you quickly see the risks to our competitiveness as a region.

We spent the past six months working with key partners to develop our story and better understand our own regional challenges. And in the coming weeks we will reassemble our delegation, as well as business and community leaders, to build an economic development agenda that benefits more people, companies and communities: an agenda that grows our own talent, bolsters small- and medium-sized firm growth, and addresses the cost of living pressures on talent attraction and retention.

There is a lot of work to be done, and it will require great collaboration and coordination. Our mission at EDC is to maximize the region’s economic prosperity and global competitiveness. To live up to that mission our economic development strategies must promote and account for growth and inclusion.

Click here for an EDC-produced research profile on the Louisville and San Diego economies.

Footnotes

1.      U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006-2015.

2.      American Community Survey, 2016; SANDAG population projections.

3.      American Community Survey, 2016.

4.      EMSI, 2017.2.

5.      Firms with fewer than 100 people; CA EDD Business Statistics, 2015.

6.      Among 50 most populous metros; National Association of Realtors, 2017; C2ER, 2017; EMSI, 2017.3.

September 29, 2017

By now, just about everyone has heard the news about Amazon and its pursuit to develop a second headquarters operation (HQ2), somewhere in North America. The announcement came out through Tech Crunch and The Wall Street Journal last month and spread like wild fire through economic development communities and elected offices across the nation. Suffice it to say that Amazon has created one of the most competitive business attraction processes in history. Cities, counties, even states, are bending over backwards to make their areas fit the profile that Amazon is seeking: a metro or suburban region with more than 1 million people, the ability to attract and retain tech talent and other amenities like direct flights to key markets.

With the input of EDOs and partners across the county and state, San Diego Regional EDC is coordinating a regional response to Amazon’s HQ2 proposal.

On paper, the region checks all the boxes that Amazon lists in its RFP. In addition, the region has a handful of quality sites that meet the requirements of their build out: ability to deliver 500,000 ft2 by 2019 and up to 8 million ft2 in subsequent phases. San Diego also has a top-tier tech workforce (Amazon has stated they could hire up to 50,000 people) and quality of life that is unparalleled throughout most of the world. But when you look beneath the surface, San Diego also needs to realize that Amazon is commanding what will inevitably be record-setting incentive packages, an area where the State of California has scarcely been competitive, and for good reason. Incentives rarely yield impacts that exceed the costs. Further, when trying to find the location for a truly Life. Changing. company, incentives usually are nothing more than marginalia. Talent, quality of life and the prospect of being able to succeed are ultimately the more important factors. Nonetheless, the process that Amazon has put forth will command hundreds of millions, if not billions in incentives – amounts that can change minds.

Second, San Diego can’t change its geography. There has been debate throughout this process whether being in the same time zone as Seattle (Amazon's current HQ) would be a blessing or a curse. While there are “experts” on both sides of the argument, we ultimately don’t know what Amazon is looking for: West Coast ease of access to Seattle, East Coast access to financial and political centers and new talent pools, or somewhere in between. Only time will tell.

In summary, we don’t know where Amazon will ultimately end up. As an EDO, EDC is excited about the opportunity to bring our region together and present our best opportunities. It’s a good test to see just what we can do when the right opportunity comes along. In conjunction with partners from around the county and state, EDC will submit a response to Amazon’s RFP ahead of its October 19 deadline. After that, it’s anyone’s guess.

September 29, 2017

This week, EDC took its Link2 San Diego program on the road, setting up shop at Cal Poly SLO’s Computing Career Fair where CS and engineering students came to connect with the biggest names in tech from around the country. The best news: we weren’t the only San Diego representation in the room. Among the sea of 35+ company booths were locals ViaSat, Booz Allen Hamiliton and Intuit.

EDC’s booth, themed San Diego: Life. Changing., served as the information hotspot for students looking to relocate after graduation. Of the 70 students we spoke with, most expressed interest in staying in California, and many were considering San Diego for post-grad. Confirming a common misconception, many students thought of San Diego as only a vacation beach-town and were unaware that the region is home to tech powerhouses Google, GoPro, Amazon, Intuit, FitBit and many more. We took this opportunity to garner student interest in the Link2 San Diego event taking place on SLO’s campus the week following (October 3), where students could network in a more casual, informational setting with local companies ViaSat, Intuit, Takeda, Solar Turbines and MindBody.

Our giveaways served to drive the San Diego reality home. The San Diego: Life. Changing. pocket guide and company map highlighted the industry opportunity available in San Diego, while our bottle openers (the fan favorite) alluded to our leading craft beer scene.

The purpose of the Link2 San Diego program is to highlight the career opportunity available in San Diego. We’ve done this locally, at SDSU, UC San Diego, USD and more. And now, with the Cal Poly Computing Career Fair, we’ve taken these efforts on the road – attracting students and soon-to-be grads into our region.