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Mega-Region

January 24, 2019

As part of EDC's Inclusive Growth initiative, we're gathering best practices to help uncover unique approaches to inclusion that can be replicated or scaled locally - including actions from employers and regions outside of San Diego. We hope that sharing these best practices will help inspire San Diego companies/organizations to take on their own. Read The New York Times article below to learn how Microsoft is contributing to affordable housing in the Seattle area:

SEATTLE — The Seattle area, home to both Microsoft and Amazon, is a potent symbol of the affordable housing crisis that has followed the explosive growth of tech hubs. Now Microsoft, arguing that the industry has an interest and responsibility to help people left behind in communities transformed by the boom, is putting up $500 million to help address the problem.

Microsoft’s money represents the most ambitious effort by a tech company to directly address the inequality that has spread in areas where the industry is concentrated, particularly on the West Coast. It will fund construction for homes affordable not only to the company’s own non-tech workers, but also for teachers, firefighters and other middle- and low-income residents.

Microsoft’s move comes less than a year after Amazon successfully pushed to block a new tax in Seattle that would have made large businesses pay a per-employee tax to fund homeless services and the construction of affordable housing. The company said the tax created a disincentive to create jobs. Microsoft, which is based in nearby Redmond, Wash., and has few employees who work in the city, did not take a position on the tax.

The debate about the rapid growth of the tech industry and the inequality that often follows has spilled across the country, particularly as Amazon, with billions of taxpayer subsidies, announced plans to build major campuses in Long Island City, Queens, and Arlington, Va., that would employ a total of at least 50,000 people. In New York, elected officials and residents have raised concerns that Amazon has not made commitments to support affordable housing.

Microsoft has been at the vanguard of warning about the potential negative effects of technology, like privacy or the unintended consequences of artificial intelligence. Executives hope the housing efforts will spur other companies to follow its lead.

“We believe everybody has a role to play, and everybody needs to play their role,” said Brad Smith, Microsoft’s president and chief legal officer.

The company’s strong finances, a sign of its resurgence under Satya Nadella as chief executive, have given it resources to deploy, Mr. Smith said. In October, the company reported net income of $8.8 billion in its most recent quarter, up 34 percent, and it had almost $136 billion in cash and short-term investments on its balance sheet. The company’s stock has risen steadily under Mr. Nadella, and Microsoft is now valued at over $800 billion.

A number of other tech businesses have tried to address the homeless crisis. Amazon’s chief executive, Jeff Bezos, has supported homeless service providers through his personal foundation, and the Salesforce chief executive, Marc Benioff, helped fund a proposition in San Francisco to tax businesses to pay for homeless services. Voters approved the tax in November, rejecting opposition from some tech leaders, including Twitter’s chief executive, Jack Dorsey.

Others plan to build housing for their own employees. Such housing may help with demand, but it has also reinforced the impression that the companies are focused too closely on their own backyards.

“This is long-range thinking by a company that has been around for a long time, and plans to be around for a long time,” said Margaret O’Mara, a professor at the University of Washington who studies the history of tech companies.

Microsoft began researching the region’s housing last summer, after the nasty tax fight in Seattle and around a peak of the housing market. The company analyzed data and hired a consultant to decide how to focus its work. The area’s home prices have almost doubled in the past eight years, and Mr. Smith said he learned that “the region has counterintuitively done less to build middle-income housing than low-income housing, especially in the suburbs.”

That squeeze hits a range of workers. “Of course, we have lots of software engineers, but the reality is that a lot of people work for Microsoft. Cafeteria workers, shuttle drivers,” Mr. Nadella said this week at a meeting with editors at the company’s headquarters. “It is a supply problem, a market failure.”

Microsoft plans to lend $225 million at subsidized rates to preserve and build middle-income housing in six cities near its Redmond headquarters. It will put an additional $250 million into low-income housing across the region. Some of those loans may be made through the federal programs that provide tax breaks for low-income housing.

The company plans to invest the money within three years, and expects most of it to go to Seattle’s suburbs.

The loans could go to private or nonprofit developers, or to governmental groups like the King County Housing Authority. As the loans are repaid, Mr. Smith said, Microsoft plans to lend the money out again to support additional projects.

The remaining $25 million will be grants to local organizations that work with the homeless, including legal aid for people fighting eviction. The Seattle Times reported Wednesday that if the $500 million were put into one project, it would create only about 1,000 units, so instead Microsoft will most likely put smaller amounts in many projects to help build “tens of thousands of units.”

The initial reaction to the company’s announcement was positive.

“There is almost no level of housing that isn’t direly needed,” said Claudia Balducci, a member of the King County Council who helps lead the Regional Affordable Housing Task Force.

report in December by the task force said that the region needs 156,000 more affordable housing units, and will need 88,000 more units by 2040 to accommodate future growth.

A growing body of research has tied the lack of affordable housing to increasing homelessness. A December study from the real estate website Zillow said that was particularly true when households pay more than a third of their income in rent. The New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle regions — the country’s largest tech hubs — have all already crossed that threshold.

“The idea that you can live in your bubble and put your fingers in your ears just doesn’t work anymore,” said Steve Schwartz, head of public affairs at Tableau Software, which is based in Seattle.

Amazon in recent years has worked closely with Mary’s Place, a homeless shelter for women and children in Seattle, and is integrating a shelter for about 65 families into one of its new buildings. Amazon has paid tens of millions of dollars to the city’s affordable housing trust fund as fees to build in the core of Seattle.

Amazon declined to comment.

Google supported the City of Mountain View’s plan to add 10,000 housing units in an area it’s developing, with 20 percent designated for lower-income residents. And Facebook has planned to build 1,500 apartments near its Menlo Park headquarters, with 15 percent to be affordable.

Microsoft has begun a major overhaul of its main campus in Redmond, committing billions of dollars in renovations and connecting it to a light rail station under construction. The company helped finance a successful campaign for voters to approve more property taxes to pay for transportation. This new investment in housing takes its commitments a step further.

“This is where Microsoft is going to be, and the region needs to work,” Ms. Balducci said. “I don’t think this is wholly altruism.”

January 8, 2019

In late November 2018, EDC released a new study, San Diego's Precision HealthEcosystem,” which explores the impact of the region’s precision health cluster and quantifies the number of firms, venture capital, and patents, as well the broader cluster across California. The web-based study  precisionhealthSD.org – includes a historic timeline, cluster map, local and state overviews, and a series of video testimonials from local business leaders at CBRE and Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine.

Hear how precision medicine changed the lives of Baby Maverick and Bill Bacon below:

Precision Health: Baby Maverick's Story from San Diego Regional EDC on Vimeo.

 

Precision Health: Bill Bacon's Story from San Diego Regional EDC on Vimeo.

Learn more at precisionhealthSD.org and #precisionhealthSD. Executive summary available here.

December 19, 2018

Every quarter San Diego Regional EDC analyzes key economic indicators that are important to understanding the regional economy and the region’s standing relative to the 25 most populous metropolitan areas in the U.S. This issue covers data from Q3 2018.

Following an increase in employment in Q2, San Diego and 12 of the most populous metros, experienced a decline in total nonfarm employment in Q3. Winding down from the summer season, the region shed 4,700 jobs - a 0.3 percent decrease in employment during the quarter. Compared to a year ago, nonfarm employment was up 28,800 jobs, or 2 percent.

Meanwhile, San Diego’s unemployment rate was 3.2 percent in Q3, down from 3.7 percent in Q2.

Key findings from the snapshot:

  • San Diego closed Q3 with an unemployment rate of 3.2 percent and the tenth lowest among the 25 most populous metros.
  • With the summer tourist season coming to an end, the leisure and hospitality sector recorded the largest quarterly loss, shedding 2,300 jobs in Q3. Other contributors to quarterly employment loss were trade, transportation, and utilities, together losing 2,100 jobs. 
  • Year-over-year, the region’s median home price continued to climb, growing by 7.1 percent.
  • VC dollars in the region increased 63.5 percent compared to a year ago.

The Quarterly Economic Snapshot analyzes key economic indicators that are important to understanding the regional economy and the region’s standing relative to the 25 most populous metropolitan areas in the U.S. This releases includes data from July to September (Q3) 2018.

December 17, 2018

At the end of each year, we like to look back on all the good this year brought with it. And with San Diego as our home, there's much to be thankful for - from an influx of startup growth, to top rankings and thriving educational systems. Read on below to see the top themes we saw come out of 2018.

From Team EDC, thank you for being part of our #SDlifechanging story.

Not a HQ town, but now we have these....
Qualcomm aside, San Diego is not often thought of as a headquarter town; but that doesn't mean large companies don't see value in setting up operations in the region. This year, we saw these tech heavyweights plant roots in San Diego:

  • Data analytics company Teradata relocated its headquarters to San Diego from Dayton, Ohio
  • Amazon to hire up to 350 at its new UTC campus
  • Walmart Labs opened 30,000 sqft in Carlsbad; to double tech workforce
  • WrikeCloudbeds, and Vertex Pharmaceuticals made significant investments in local expansions
  • And most recently, Apple announced it will be expanding to San Diego, supporting up to 1,000 jobs

SD leads charge in the healthcare revolution
Home to more than 1,200 life sciences companies and more than 80 research institutes, the San Diego region is on the brink of scientific breakthrough each and every day. This year, we saw Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine and Illumina set the Guinness world record for fastest genetic diagnoses in newborns; Scripps Translational Science Institute was awarded a $34+ million grant for its work in digital health; Salk scientist Janelle Ayres received $1 million to fund her microbial research; Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute identified never-before-seen DNA recombination in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease; local biotechs PfenexSynthorx, and Trovagene went public; Illumina acquired Edico Genome and Pacific Biosciences in separate deals worth more than $2.2 billion; LunaDNA launched the first-of-its-kind platform that offers stock for DNA data; and much more #SDlifechanging work.

SD selected as national UAS testing center
With a continued commitment to growing San Diego’s reputation as a hub for innovation, the City of San Diego, City of Chula Vista, and EDC announced that San Diego has been selected to participate in a new program by the U.S. Department of Transportation to advance the testing of unmanned aircraft technology, grow the innovation economy, and create jobs. As part of the program, the Chula Vista Police Department has begun to deploy drones for public safety operations. Read more.

Local colleges expand, bolster talent pipeline
San Diego's educational institutions produce a top-tier talent pipeline for employers both here and abroad. And now more than ever, San Diego State University, UC San Diego, San Diego Community College District, and others are expanding programs and campuses to promote inclusion and support industry needs. This year's successes include:

  • CSU San Marcos announced the creation of its bachelor of science in computer engineering thanks to more than $1.5 million in donations from local companies and their employees
  • Mira Costa and Palomar colleges to waive tuition for all first-time, full-time students as part of California College Promise program
  • Philanthropist Denny Sanford made a landmark, $100 million gift to the National University System to expand its social emotional learning program
  • Southwestern College was awarded $325,000 in grants to fund services for veteran and undocumented students
  • San Diego City College expanded its cybersecurity program to include associate and certificate opportunities
  • With its first female president Adela de la Torre at the helm, San Diego State University is set to launch a new Big Data Analytics graduate program
  • UC San Diego received a record $75 million from computer science alum Taner Halicioğlu to grow its new data science institute

SD companies rake in big bucks for growth
Throughout 2018, San Diego saw more than 80 venture capital deals. While the number of deals is down from last year, the cash totals are record-breaking in more ways than one. San Diego companies raised more $1.8 billion (as of Q3), with the vast majority – $1.5 billion – going to healthcare companies. The region is on pace to have its best year for VC since 2000. Top deals include SamumedIdeaya Biosciences, Gossamer BioGrailHelix, and dozens more.

SD impact felt 'round the world'
A globally connected region is a more successful region, which is why its crucial that San Diego innovation is seen and felt across the world. This year, we saw this locally-made technology make impacts in key international markets:

  • Cubic Transportation Systems secured contracts to provide its mass-transit ticketing services to Queensland and Sydney, Australia, as well as other international cities
  • Inc. 5000 company Scientist.com announced its expansion into Japan as part of a WTC-led trade mission
  • Forge Therapeutics is set to double its local footprint due in part to an international deal signed during a WTC-led trade mission to the UK
  • General Atomics Aeronautical Systems secured an $81 million contract from the U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center for the UK
  • Carlsbad-based Viasat added AeromexicoFinnair, and EL AL Israel Airline to the list of international airlines it supplies with inflight Wi-Fi
  • San Marcos-based Ocean Reef Group donated its full-face dive masks used to rescue a youth soccer team trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand

SD tops the charts
San Diego held its own in many of this year's top rankings. From the region's entrepreneurial culture to its commitment to sustainability and innovation, top-tier publications and organizations took notice of San Diego. Rankings include: 

 

November 29, 2018

San Diego is home to more than 350 precision health companies that hold 3,610 patents, according to a study released by yours truly: San Diego Regional EDC.  “San Diego's Precision Health Ecosystem” explores the impact of the region’s precision health cluster and quantifies the number of firms, venture capital and patents, as well the broader cluster across California.

The web-based study – precisionhealthSD.org – includes a historic timeline, cluster map, local and state overviews, and a series of video testimonials from local business leaders.

Large local companies like Illumina and Thermo Fisher Scientific, startups and small businesses like CureMatch, LunaDNA, and EpicentRX, as well as hospitals and research institutes are helping lead the charge in precision health and enabling people to live longer, healthier lives.

Using a person’s unique genes, medical history, and environment, the field of precision health seeks to customize effective therapies and disease treatment. More than genomics and pharmaceuticals, precision health also encompasses a wide range of related fields that allow for the collection, storage, analysis, and use of health data for more precise diagnosis of individual conditions and risk factors.

“From personalized cancer vaccines to record-breaking DNA sequencing of newborns, San Diego companies and research institutes are revolutionizing healthcare as we know it,” said Kirby Brady, research director, San Diego Regional EDC. “Consistently ranked among the top five cities for startups and life sciences, as well as the #1 region for genomics patents in the U.S., San Diego brings more to the table than its beaches – we are changing lives and curing disease from the offices and labs throughout the region.”

KEY FINDINGS

  • San Diego precision health companies secured $1.3 billion in venture capital in 2018, to date.
  • San Diego precision health companies hold 825 registered trademarks, and 3,610 patents.
  • San Diego is home to more than 350 precision health companies, 80 research institutions, 30 hospitals, and five universities.
  • Economic impact of precision health in California (2017):
    • 29,000 direct jobs
    • 99,000 total impacted jobs
    • $17 billion direct economic impact

Precision Health: Why San Diego from San Diego Regional EDC on Vimeo.

The report was produced by San Diego Regional EDC, and sponsored by Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc., CBRE, Kaiser Permanente, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Scripps Research.

Read the full study at precisionhealthSD.org, or the print version hereFor more research from San Diego Regional EDC, visit sandiegobusiness.org/research-center.

October 25, 2018

Today, the Federal Aviation Administration, City of Chula Vista, City of San Diego, San Diego Regional EDC and Cape announced the launch of a test program to deploy drones for proactive public safety operations by the Chula Vista Police Department. This project has been made possible through the FAA’s Unmanned Aerial Systems Integrated Pilot Program (IPP).

As part of the IPP, drones equipped with Cape Aerial Telepresence software will be deployed to a scene within two minutes from Chula Vista Police Department headquarters, to provide police with video and decision quality data. In true #SDlifechanging fashion, these drones will serve as first responders, assisting in incidents such as life safety, crime in progress, fleeing subjects, fire and more. The drone program is an element of the Chula Vista Smart City Action Plan to implement technology and data tools to enhance city services, advance public safety, promote the efficient use of taxpayer dollars, engage residents, and encourage growth in the local economy. Simulation below:

San Diego region among first to deploy drones as first respondesers from San Diego on Vimeo.

Since CVPD began operations on October 22, a drone has been deployed 29 times.  About 30 percent of those calls were related to some type of disturbance and about 17 percent of the time, drone pilots were able to clear a call without ground units responding (e.g., the subjects were gone), thereby keeping officers free for higher priority calls. The drone also was used to locate a felony domestic violence suspect in a transient camp surrounded by heavy vegetation. The drone pilot was able to safely direct officers to the camp while observing the suspect’s actions until he was arrested. The drone was also successfully used to locate and direct officers to arrest subjects on two other disturbance calls. These are just a few of the early successes of CVPD’s UAS pilot program. Drone pilots and patrol officers recognize the potential for even more public safety benefits as the program evolves.

San Diego’s IPP local program also will include projects like flying medical specimens from UC San Diego for expedited results and cost savings, testing food delivery from restaurants to consumers using Uber, and testing the integration and communication between driverless cars and unmanned aircraft systems.

The City of San Diego’s Homeland Security Department is collaborating with more than 20 regional organizations to implement the IPP. In addition to EDC, partners include: City of Chula Vista, Cape, AirMap, Qualcomm, AT&T, California Governor’s Military Council, California Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GoBiz), Uber, UC San Diego Health, Intel, GE Ventures, and others.

The San Diego regional IPP is one of only 10 agencies nationwide chosen to participate, including the states of Kansas, Virginia, Alaska and North Dakota and the cities of Reno and Memphis. The San Diego region also was selected as one of 10 autonomous vehicle testing sites in the nation in 2017. The designated testing sites form a national community that share information and collaborate with the private sector to advance the safe development of unmanned vehicles.

The federal Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration Pilot Program (IPP) is an opportunity for state, local, and tribal governments to partner with private sector entities, such as UAS operators or manufacturers, to accelerate safe UAS integration. The Program is expected to foster a meaningful dialogue on the balance between local and national interests related to UAS integration and provide actionable information to the USDOT and FAA on expanded and universal integration of UAS into the National Airspace System.

For more information on the drone program, visit www.sandiego.gov/ohs/unmanned-aircraft-systems.

 

September 26, 2018

 If you had arrived at Plantible Foods in San Marcos before August 22, it would have looked much like a typical farm; greenhouses and an abundance of open space.

But a few days later the space was completely transformed for the quarterly Startup78 meetup. On August 22, more than 200 individuals gathered to learn more about the food innovation scene in San Diego's North County. From a company that turns bread scraps into vodka to two sisters on a quest to start the first museum dedicated to the avocado, North County is full of companies on the forefront of food innovation entrepreneurs. 

Every food entrepreneurs experience is different. The crowd heard from Maurtis van de Ven (Plantible Foods), Ann Buehner and Mary Carr (The Cado), Sam Chereskin (Misadventure & Company), Chuck Samuelson (Kitchens for Good), as well as representatives from Suja and Stone.

But food entrepreneurship isn't just about cashing in. Many of these founders are looking to solve some of the world's biggest problems, like hunger, health living, and food waste. Kitchens for Good is a social enterprise that seeks to minimize food waste, increase sustainability and provide culinary training for populations that are experiences high unemployment rates.

“Five-and-a-half years ago I had a very nice job with a local company, Stone Brewing, having tons of fun” said Chuck Samuelson, founder and board member of Kitchens for Good, in the San Diego Union-Tribune. Nonetheless, he said  “I kept waking up thinking I’ve got to do more.”

Guests were also treated to a beer garden, full of some North County's most prominent breweries and distilleries, as well as the opportunity to sample some of North County’s tastiest food innovations.   

Startup78 is an initiative of Innovate78 and San Diego Regional EDC to unite and amplify the resources available to entrepreneurs along the 78 Corridor with the goal of helping startups scale to become long-term, viable businesses that support San Diego's economy.

Join Innovate78 for the next Startup78 event, focused on life changing science, on October 17 at the Oceanside Museum of Art. Register here.

 

 

September 24, 2018

As part of EDC’s Inclusive Growth initiative, it is important to highlight action-oriented programs throughout the region that promote inclusion and serve as key examples for other employers to adopt and scale for their own organizations. After releasing its interactive web study Building San Diego’s Talent Pipeline, EDC spoke with Naila Chowdhury, director of social impact and innovation at UC San Diego, who has been leading the charge there in addressing critical issues affecting underrepresented communities in San Diego, as well as the rest of the world. Read about UCSD’s compelling programs in Chowdhury’s commentary below and see how you can get involved or implement.

My role as  Director of the Office of Social Impact & Innovation (SII) at UC San Diego, along with its essential partners, serves the campus by actively promoting partnership, collaboration and enhanced relations between all campus stakeholders, especially students, the community, corporations, local, national and global organizations in the area of Social Justice. Since joining the University of California San Diego three years ago, I have been working on creating awareness and educating the university community about serious issues that need addressing in our beautiful City of San Diego.

I believe that gender inequalities and discrimination attitudes and practices, that hold women and girls back, also include our underserved communities and must be confronted and eliminated. It cannot remain just words anymore; we have to practice these words in every sphere of our lives. We at large have to establish public and private partnerships with civil society, academia, nonprofits, private sector, foundations, and large corporations. Everyone has to feel and be a part of this inexorable march to usher in a new era of enhanced, equal opportunities for women and minorities. Women and girls represent the largest untapped resources for social and economic development in our world today. Local issues like women's leadership and economic empowerment, is critical to future development, sustainability, equity and peace in our world. Leaders of today must make a commitment to dismantling institutional barriers and ensure a level playing field so that every woman has the same opportunity as any man while seeking livelihood opportunities in day-to-day work, society or access to finance and business.

The Office of Social Impact and Innovation at UC San Diego is committed to bringing solutions to solve the world's most pressing challenges like human trafficking, social inequality, and human rights violations trough programs like the upcoming Time to Rise Global Empowerment Summit We want to focus on actions and solutions. These challenges are complex and require innovation, creativity and dedication to solve. We need everyone’s collaboration to build bridges and share information to address these difficult issues, and it is imperative that the San Diego business community is a part of the dialogue and solutions.

We at the University of California believe that leadership and mentoring training, role models, and skill development must begin at an early age to help build an equal and inclusive world. With this in mind the university, along with sponsor partners, is recognizing the unsung heroes during the summit and engaging the participation of 50 youth from Smart City Saturday, Teen only Hackathon -Stop Youth Trafficking.  In preparation of their hackathon, they will be mingling and interviewing the survivors and refugees in attendance, and learning from one another.   

I am very satisfied with the many ways the University of California San Diego is addressing, supporting under represented, and minority students by offering services and programs to ensure students have adequate resources during their education at UCSD. I will mention just a few:

  • Programs that include undocumented students through their own Undocumented Student Services Office, which strongly advocates and generates a sense of community for all students that are undocumented or come from mixed immigration-status families: http://students.ucsd.edu/sponsor/undoc/.
  •  Centers like the Raza Resource Centro (RRC) is one of the Campus Community Centers supporting the UCSD Chicanx- Latinx. By using words with the letter X (latinX) it creates an inclusive environment for all of the students and individuals that visit their space, regardless of gender identity or expression: http://raza.ucsd.edu/.
  • Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP) assists first-generation, socio-economically disadvantaged, and English-language learners by helping them prepare for postsecondary education, pursue graduate and professional school opportunities, and achieve success in the workplace: https://eaop.ucsd.edu/.
  • The TRIO Outreach programs offering services to San Diego High Schools on college advising, financial aid assistance, career awareness, educational field trips and summer programs and tours.  All aimed at recruiting potential first generation college student and/or low-income students: http://trio.ucsd.edu/.
  • UCSD supports the first generation student by providing Student Success Coaches aimed at improving first-generation college student access and success, eliminate obstacles, and improve pathways for students to achieve their academic and professional goals: https://srs.ucsd.edu/about/index.html.
  • Through scholarship funding, services and programs, the Chancellor’s Associates Scholarship Program (CASP) recognizes and supports talented local students with financial need and great potential and motivation to succeed at UC San Diego: http://students.ucsd.edu/sponsor/casp/.
  • The PATHS ways to STEM through Enhanced Access and Mentorship. This program model is aimed at mitigating  historically evident barriers and establish an infrastructure of resources, communications, and professional development within UC San Diego and in the surrounding community to increase under represented student to enter the STEM field: http://paths.ucsd.edu/.

According to Dr. Gentry Patrick, Director of Mentorship and Diversity for Biological Sciences at UC San Diego, what works for long term success with underserved minorities, is to immerse the students with professional context, leadership skills, support network of peers, faculty and alumni. It's important to show how STEM affects their life and how they can be an example in their community and that STEM is not for somebody else. To make these programs successful what is needed is a broad base of support, partner with organization, individuals for funding, engagement, placement opportunities and mentorship possibilities.

We are happy to announce that during the Time to Rise Summit 2018, a PATH Scholar will be a recipient of SII -Social Impact Scholarship in partnership with Qualcomm Institute and Alliance4Empowerment (www.socialimpact.ucsd.eduwww.alliance4empowerment.net).

In summary, social impact is more than social justice.  Our efforts at SII focus on areas of inclusion, inequalities, transformational leadership, and economic empowerment. It is time to rise together to address these social challenges. We hope you join us at our Time To Rise Summit on October 6https://time-to-rise-summit.eventbrite.com.

Livestream will be available the day of the Summit at https://youtu.be/e9wv2hUhE4A

UC San Diego-Social Impact is conscientious about its responsibility to leave behind a better and more collaborative world by training and informing Change Makers Who are the Source of Change. When we work with community partners and other collaborators, we build responsible caring ambassadors and we build bridges globally to develop international working relationships.  At UC San Diego, we are changemakers. That is why Ashoka, the world’s largest network of social entrepreneurs, recently designated the university as a “Changemaker Campus”.  Be the source of change with us!

 
September 12, 2018

Today, Propel San Diego partners – San Diego Military Advisory Council (SDMAC) and San Diego Regional EDC – unveiled 15 companies selected to participate in the Defense Innovation Voucher program (DIV). DIV is a comprehensive business initiative designed to build resiliency in small, local defense companies and help them find pathways to diversify their revenue. 

San Diego is home to the largest concentration of military assets in the world and the largest federal military workforce in the country. When considering the overall ripple effects of the defense cluster in San Diego, about 22 percent of San Diego’s gross regional product (GRP) is the result of defense-related spending. But the breadth and depth of defense activity stretches far beyond military bases and naval ships; from telecomm to robotics, aerospace to cybersecurity, San Diego’s defense cluster is the driving force behind the region’s innovation economy.

According to EDC’s recently released report, Mapping San Diego’s Defense Ecosystem, 40 percent of the companies registered in San Diego County as defense contractors employ five people or less. Propel San Diego’s DIV program serves to help those small defense companies build resiliency and sustainability through times of fluctuation in defense spending.

“Like many local industries, San Diego’s defense supply chain is mostly made up of small businesses, with 89 percent of firms employing less than 50 people. As federal funds continue to fluctuate in defense spending, small business that often rely on one to two large contracts, are at risk,” said Nikia Clarke, VP of economic development, San Diego Regional EDC. “The newly launched DIV program is designed to help these companies diversify their revenue and become more resilient, thus increasing their ability to withstand fluctuations in DoD spending and downturns in our economy.”

This pilot program will offer complimentary consulting services and curriculum to improve the competitiveness of small defense companies, selected through a competitive needs-based selection process. The program will help companies compete for government or defense contracts and/or explore pivoting products and services to commercial markets.

The DIV program will provide services in these three specific areas:

1. Direct Assistance: EDC has identified qualified consultants who will provide $15,000 in complimentary consulting services in one of the following categories: marketing, accounting compliance, certifications (SDVOSB, AS9100, AS5553, ISO 9001, etc.), lean supply chain and additive manufacturing tools, and strategic planning.

2. Boot Camp: Enrollment in a six-month long course designed to provide best practices to company leadership on strategies to improve company competitiveness.

3. DIV Grand Prize Competition: This competition will award a company based off their level of engagement in these activities and progress towards their goals with an additional $25,000 to work with one of the pre-approved contractors to perform new work with the company.

Partnering in the DIV program as the key underwriter is Booz Allen Hamilton, a leader in the defense consulting industry.

Propel San Diego is a partnership of six key organizations: East County Economic Development Council, South County Economic Development Council, San Diego Workforce Partnership, San Diego Military Advisory Council, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation, and the City of San Diego. Each of these organizations are also working on specific business support programs to create a more robust defense ecosystem here in San Diego.

For more information about the DIV program please visit SDMAC.org/propelsandiego.

The 2018 DIV companies are as follows:

  1. Accel-RF Instruments Corporation
  2. Amaratek
  3. American Lithium Energy Corporation
  4. Coast Precision Enterprises, Inc.
  5. EpiSys Science, Inc.
  6. Fuse Integration, Inc.
  7. GET Engineering Corporation
  8. intelliSolutions, inc.
  9. Marine Group Boat Works, LLC
  10. Ocean Aero
  11. Planck Aerosystems
  12. Sidus Solutions
  13. Trabus Technologies
  14. VetPowered, LLC
  15. Vortex Engineering

This project is funded in whole or in part with Community Economic Adjustment Assistance for Reductions in Defense Industry Employment funds provided by the U.S. Department of Defense - Office of Economic Adjustment to the City of San Diego.

 

September 6, 2018

In an effort to build a more inclusive economy, San Diego Regional EDC and its Inclusive Growth Steering Committee of 40 employers officially endorsed a regional goal to double the number of skilled workers produced in San Diego County to 20,000 per year by 2030, as well as a set of recommendations, to develop a stronger local talent pipeline – the first of three main goals of EDC’s Inclusive Growth initiative.

“We have untapped talent all throughout San Diego County, especially in our Latino communities,” said Dr. Patricia Prado-Olmos, vice president of community engagement, California State University San Marcos, and Inclusive Growth Steering Committee member. “When higher education and companies come together to provide our traditionally underserved populations with the education, training, and development they need to qualify for highly-skilled and high-paying jobs, we are able to create a better San Diego where everyone can thrive.”

BUILDING THE TALENT PIPELINE
Amid a nationwide battle for skilled talent, San Diego must also look inward and focus on building a stronger talent pipeline locally to sustain its growth. Earlier this year, EDC released research that shows the region’s largest and fastest growing population (Hispanics) is statistically the least prepared for high-skilled high-wage jobs, with 85 percent without a bachelor’s degree.

In its latest study release, EDC found that there are more than 100 key occupations in the region with shortages in skilled labor, many of which fuel San Diego’s innovation economy. Projections show an estimated 20,000 job openings per year in these same occupations, which means that San Diego’s current talent supply falls short in meeting anticipated skilled labor demands of tomorrow’s economy. The study also found that San Diego’s current innovation economy does not reflect the region’s population, as the Hispanic population is glaringly underrepresented at only 17 percent. Guided by the findings of this study and input from expert advisors, EDC’s Inclusive Growth Steering Committee—comprised of 40 regional employers—has endorsed a regional goal to double the number of skilled workers produced in San Diego County to 20,000 per year by 2030.

Companies that have officially endorsed this regional target include Northrop Grumman, Qualcomm, Brown Law Group, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Cox Communications, ResMed, Cubic Transportation Systems, and more. For a complete list of employers committed to this effort, visit the interactive web study online.

To further support this goal, the Inclusive Growth Steering Committee has also developed the following recommendations for employers to adopt and implement at their organizations:

  1. Transparency – provide EDC with anonymized data on workforce demographics to benchmark and track over time. Understanding the composition of the region’s largest employers will provide insight into where the region stands at present and how much progress is being made over time.
  2. Engagement – participate in direct student-workplace exposure programs that directly engage the students aimed to prepare for high-skilled work in 2030. Providing K-12 students with opportunities to visualize themselves in the roles that the regional economy needs them to fill.
  3. Investment – invest in post-secondary educational programs resulting in qualified talent at respective workplace.

“Latinos are the most underrepresented group across innovation companies in San Diego,” said Cynthia Curiel, vice president of communications, Northrop Grumman, and Inclusive Growth Steering Committee member. “We are in a war for talent, and recruiting from outside the region isn’t enough. By investing in building our local workforce, we can fill jobs and lift communities that are currently underrepresented in San Diego’s innovation economy.“

EDC and the Inclusive Growth Steering Committee strongly encourage other regional employers to adopt these recommendations and actively promote inclusion at their respective workplaces.

BUILDING A STRONGER SAN DIEGO: EDC’S INCLUSIVE GROWTH INITIATIVE

Like many of its metro counterparts, San Diego has its fair share of economic challenges. While its innovation economy continues to grow and bring in much wealth and opportunity to the region, it also leaves many San Diegans unable to afford the rising cost of living.

To help sustain San Diego’s future growth, EDC launched a data-driven initiative focused on promoting inclusive growth as an economic imperative, emphasizing that San Diego employers must take active measures to promote inclusion, or the region will no longer be able to compete.

Together with its Inclusive Growth Steering Committee, EDC aims to set regional targets and release actionable recommendations for three main goals: build a strong local talent pool; equip small businesses to compete; and address the affordability crisis.

“The regional economy is changing rapidly, and we must be inclusive to succeed and compete,” said Mark Cafferty, president and CEO, San Diego Regional EDC. “For EDC, this means changing the economic development discussion to be talent-centric and inclusive in nature. These recommendations represent the first step in our regional employers’ commitment to developing local talent and preparing a workforce that is diverse, ambitious, and capable of meeting the demands of our growing economy.”

Over the next several months, EDC will continue to establish regional targets and recommendations for its other two goals. EDC will also support employers by facilitating the collection of data for quick, consistent reporting and serving as a liaison between employers and various community partners to expand reach and increase exposure of scalable programs.

For more information about the Inclusive Growth initiative, visit inclusiveSD.org.

Follow along on social media with #inclusiveSD

View the full interactive web study release – “Building San Diego’s Talent Pipeline” – here.