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MFG Day

October 11, 2017

Last week, thousands of MFG Day events were held across the country to celebrate modern manufacturing. In San Diego, more than 50 companies participated in events - from facility tours to regional resource fairs - to showcase a wide range of job opportunities. This included a private tour of Samsung’s maquiladora in Tijuana, which employs upwards of 6,000 workers, alongside Rep. Susan Davis and more than 20 EDC partners. Fun fact: San Diego’s MFG day is one of the only bi-national celebrations in the country. The week culminated at EDC’s annual breakfast event, attended by more than 200 local business and civic leaders.

The goal of MFG day is to change public perception of the sector, and introduce people to manufacturing careers. Even though San Diego has a smaller concentration of manufacturing employment than the national average, the region is home to nearly 110,000 manufacturing jobs, spread across more than 300 industries1. These are not just team assembler and machinist roles; there are hundreds of unique occupations from finance to marketing to engineering. And these are good paying jobs. In 2016, the average annual salary exceeded $79,000 in San Diego2.

Dismissiveness toward manufacturing comes from a track record of employment declines that began well before the Great Recession, in large part due to increases in automation. However, with a focus on advanced manufacturing, San Diego has fared much better. Since 2007, when the recession began, manufacturing employment declined 11.2 percent nationwide. During that same time, manufacturing in San Diego grew 3.2 percent, adding more than 3,400 jobs3.

This is because manufacturing in San Diego is driven by the innovation economy that makes aircrafts, medical equipment and semiconductors. Of course, there are also apparel makers, plastic producers and world-famous breweries. But the top eight manufacturing industries, accounting for more than 61,000 manufacturing jobs, are all in advanced industries such as aerospace and biotech4.  

Strategic development of San Diego's defense and life science clusters, as well as the strong partnership with Baja California, has helped the region’s manufacturing sector remain relevant and competitive.

1-4EMSI 2017.3.

September 29, 2016

As part of the blog series leading up to San Diego MFG Day, we’re featuring 5 food and beverage items #MadeinSD enjoyed by millions of people across the world.

  1. Kashi – Started by a husband and wife duo in 1981, Kashi began with humble beginnings in La Jolla as the couple wanted to create food that promotes a healthy lifestyle. From their flagship cereal to granola bars and many other snacks, Kashi remains one of the largest and most recognizable natural foods companies in the world. 
  2. Suja Juice – A Forbes story from 2014 sums up the start of Suja perfectly: “A surfer dude and self-taught chef teams up with a law-school dropout turned yoga instructor to create one of the fastest-growing organic juice makers ever.” The San Diego company has become the fastest growing organic, cold-pressured and Non-GMO beverage company in the U.S. 
  3. Chuao Chocolatier – Bacon, potato chip, firecracker – these are just a few of the gourmet chocolate bars made by Carlsbad-based Chuao Chocolatier. Recently moving from a boutique retailer to a wide spread distribution model, Chuao continues to expand into new markets, both domestic and international. Already widely available in high-end hotels, Whole Foods, Target and Starbucks, the company recently inked a deal that puts the premium chocolate in 7,800 of 8,000 CVS stores in the U.S. 
  4. Mission Brewery – Established in 1913 and shut down during prohibition, Mission Brewery was reestablished by home brewer Dan Selis in 2007 in downtown San Diego’s East Village. With 40 national and international awards under its belt, Mission Brewery is a staple in the San Diego craft brewing industry. Check out their facility with a tour during Manufacturing Week, here
  5. Olli Salumeria – Salami manufacturer Olli Salumeria creates artisenal slow-cured salumi includes salami, salamini, cooking fats and whole-cured meats. Founded in 2010 by two friends, Oliviero (Olli) Colmignoli and Charles Vosmik, the company’s products are a favorite of celebs like Oprah Winfrey.

Celebrate all that's #MadeinSD on October 7. Visit sdmfgday.com to get involved. 

September 15, 2016

Fifteen years after September 11, 2001, we stand united as a country – remembering the travesty, but holding high the men and women who defend our country and freedoms every day.

As part of the blog series leading up to San Diego MFG Day, we’re featuring 5 defense technologies #MadeinSD used to protect our country, and U.S. allies across the world.

  1. Headquartered in San Diego, Cubic Global Defense (CGD) is a leading provider of virtual, constructive and game-based training solutions, special operations, mission support and intelligence for the U.S. and allied forces in more than 35 nations. CGD’s primary focus is to raise human performance by providing an integrated, effective learning assessment experience that drives combat readiness. 
  2. GKN Aerospace, a UK-based manufacturer with large operations in El Cajon, develops high-performance components and assemblies for aerostructures, engine products, landing gear, wiring systems and more. The company provides advanced transparent coatings and vertically integrated supply of aerospace grade acrylic material, and offers a full range of capability for design, analysis, testing and certification of military canopies, cockpit windows and passenger windows. 
  3. Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) is a premier technology integrator in the technical, engineering, intelligence and enterprise information technology markets. With operations in San Diego, the company designs, develops and sustains offerings that empower diplomatic missions, support warfighter requirements and advance exploration from the ocean floor to outer space. Specifically, SAIC develops the Tsunami Buoy, a surface satellite communications buoy with deep-water data measurement sensors and mooring subsystem capable of detecting encroaching tsunamis and more. 
  4. Located in the San Diego bay, General Dynamics NASSCO is the largest full service shipyard on the West Coast. The company specializes in the design and construction of auxiliary and support ships for the U.S. Navy, and oil tankers and dry cargo carriers for commercial markets. NASSCO is currently building the USNS Hershel “Woody” Williams – the Navy’s second Expeditionary Sea Base – named for the last surviving recipient of the Medal of Honor from the Battle of Iwo Jima. The 784-foot-long ship will serve as a flexible platform to support a variety of missions, including air mine countermeasures, counter-piracy operations, maritime security and humanitarian missions.
  5. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions. Located in Poway, GA-ASI is highly regarded for its development of the Predator aircraft: a long line of RPA systems, beginning with the highly successful "RQ-1" Predator aircraft first flown by the U.S. Air Force in 1995. Predator since has been named by Smithsonian's Air & Space magazine as one of the top ten aircraft that changed the world. The line of aircraft has been acquired by the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, NASA, the Royal Air Force, the Italian Air Force, the French Air Force, the Spanish Air Force and others. 

MFG Day – and the manufacturing companies it spotlights – serves as a testament to San Diego’s impact around the world. Companies here develop products and services that change, save and better the lives of millions of people every day. Join us October 7 to celebrate.

September 8, 2016

One of the most unique industries in San Diego is Sports & Active Lifestyle, a key driver of the regional economy - impacting more than 32,000 jobs - and a staple in our local culture. As part of our series leading up to San Diego MFG Day on October 7, we’re bringing you five items #MadeinSD used by professional athletes around the world.

  1. SKLZ: Endorsed by USA Soccer star Alex Morgan, Evan Longoria of the New York Yankees and hometown favorite Jason Verrett of the Chargers, SKLZ is a staple in the sports training industry. Founded in 2002 with the invention and success of the Hit-a-Way baseball training product, SKLZ products are used to train the world’s top competitive athletes with lines of performance training products and programs.
  2. FOX: If you’ve ever ridden a mountain bike, motorcycle or other offroad vehicle, chances are FOX supplied the shock absorbers. FOX moved their off-road and military components division to El Cajon in 2012 and continues to be an industry leader in shock absorbers and racing suspension products for snowmobiles, mountain bikes, motorcycles, ATVs, UTVs, off-road cars, trucks and SUVs.
  3. TaylorMade Golf: It’s no surprise the largest golf equipment and apparel company in the world is headquartered right here in Carlsbad, as the region is one of the most active golf hubs in the country. The company sponsors top PGA golfers including Sergio García, Jason Day and Dustin Johnson. For this first time in the TaylorMade history, the company has the #1 and #2 golfers playing TaylorMade equipment.
  4. Rusty Surfboards: In 1969, Rusty Psiendorfer shaped his first surfboard as a high school student in San Diego. Sixteen years later, he found Rusty Surfboards – now a top-tier  surfboard manufacturer based in San Diego. The Rusty “R” logo is internationally recognized in the surf and surf apparel industry.
  5. Sticky Bumps: Going hand-in-hand with Rusty, anyone who owns a surfboard has used Sticky Bumps. As surfing became popular in the early 1940s, surfers began relying on candle wax to keep their feet glued to the board while riding the wave. As the industry-leading surf wax maker, Sticky Bumps makes its products in Vista and is recognized globally as the go-to surf wax. 

 

Celebrate all that's #MadeinSD on October 7. Visit sdmfgday.com to get involved. 

August 30, 2016

EDC investor Innovative Commercial Environments (ICE) is a full service hospitality and office furniture dealership. From design concept to project completion, ICE creates an inspired, ergonomic workplace that allows companies to increase efficiency, creativity and output. In addition to representing more than 300 manufacturers, ICE also fabricates a line of locally made office furniture – supporting local artisans, welders and retired military personnel.

Recently, ICE provided EDC's office with a custom reception desk with walnut “live edge” wood slab accents and laser cut steel signage. We sat down with the company founder & CEO DeLinda Forsythe to discuss ICE's commitment to San Diego.

1)Tell us about Innovative Commercial Environments (ICE).

ICE helps organizations consciously build their corporate culture.  ICE crafts furniture solutions that encourage a company’s staff to connect, solve problems together, grow and ultimately “create magic.”  The open environment encourages team work.  The majority of the workforce today is under 35 and they have a strong affinity towards more simple materials.  They don’t want to work in a space that feels contrived.  They came through a rough recession, they want to work in a space that feels like money was spent wisely.  Our furniture is a fun way to help management build an empowered corporate ecosystem.
 
We've recently expanded from a full service office and hospitality furniture dealership to manufacturing a “brewery inspired” office benching system through ICE WorkShop. 

2) Tell us more about WorkShop and the benefits of innovative office design.

At $1000-$1500 per user, customization can not only be affordable, it can also be designed to complement and enhance the architecture of a space while meeting unique client requirements of height adjustability and flexibility. WorkShop can be designed to reflect your corporate culture, helping attract and retain the best talent at your company.  A talent race is on and we think the authentic design of our WorkiBeam system can provide a competitive advantage.

Join other local manufacturers on Oct. 7 for MFG Day 2016 as we celebrate one of San Diego's most diverse industries.

August 19, 2016

With just under two months to San Diego Manufacturing Day, we’re kicking off a five-part blog series on San Diego-made products you didn’t know were made right in our backyard. Here are five of some of your favorite products #MadeinSD:

  1. WD-40 – If you’ve fixed a squeaky door, greased a bike chain or worked on cars, chances are you’ve used WD-40. Founded as a chemical company in 1953, WD-40 Company remains a staple in San Diego manufacturing. Gary Ridge, president and CEO of WD-40 explains, “San Diego is a good city to be in if you’re in international business, as I can be on a call with London in the morning and with Shanghai in the afternoonWe like to say ‘the sun never sets on WD-40.”
  2. TaylorMade golf clubs – PGA Tour pros like Dustin Johnson, Jason Day and Sergio Garcia can be seen swinging TaylorMade clubs in tournaments watched by millions almost weekly. Best known for innovating metal drivers starting in 1979, TaylorMade remains the largest golf equipment and apparel company in the world. Fore!
  3. Taylor Guitars – Used by world-famous musicians including Jason Mraz  and Taylor Swift, Taylor Guitars – located in San Diego’s East County – is the world’s leading guitar manufacturer. With operations on both sides of the border, Taylor maintains a high-level of quality control over its products.
  4. Stone Brewing craft beer– The recognizable gargoyle and award-winning beer from Stone has made waves for taking on “corporate beer”. Started in North County in 1996, Stone now boasts seven locations including a newly opened brewery in Berlin. Cheers! 
  5. Illumina's instruments for genetic sequencing – Recently named the “Google of Genetic Testing”, Illumina has taken over San Diego’s UTC business center which houses the company’s worldwide headquarters and more than 2,000 employees. More than 90 percent of the world’s genetic sequencing is done on Illumina instruments.

Stay tuned for our next list: five #MadeinSD products used by the world’s top athletes

Celebrate with us October 7. Visit sdmfgday.com to get involved. 

October 8, 2014

On the first Friday of every October, manufacturers across the country open their doors to the public to celebrate National Manufacturing Day (MFG Day). Last Friday, San Diego had 28 companies – more than any other region in California – participate in the day’s activities. Companies representing San Diego and Northern Baja’s diverse industries from biotech to aerospace, UAV and beer, united to show San Diegans all that’s made right here in our backyard.

In case you missed the morning’s panel and tours, we’ve compiled a list of things we’ve learned about these San Diego makers.

  1. Science and beer can share a roof
    Beer is science. If there is any company that demonstrates this, it’s San Diego-based White Labs, which was one of the innovators that opened its doors to the public this MFGDay. Part laboratory, part brewery, they are participating in another innovation activity San Diego knows well: decoding the genome; except instead of looking at the human genome, they’re looking to unravel beer’s DNA.
  2. Northern Baja is the gold standard of manufacturing
    CareFusion is one company that’s using the mega-region to its advantage. As a medical device manufacturer, they have acquired companies all over the U.S. However, all of its U.S. manufacturing facilities pale in comparison to its facilities right across the border, in Tijuana and Mexicali, said Carlos Nunez, chief medical officer of CareFusion, at a kickoff panel hosted by EDC on the morning of MFG Day. Many other innovators throughout San Diego have pointed to access to Mexico as a reason to set up shop in the region.

    On Sunday, CareFusion announced they were being acquired by Becton, Dickinson & Co (BD), a New Jersey-based medical technology company. The acquisition is further evidence of San Diego’s ability to develop sought-after, innovative companies. BD is committed to maintaining an active presence in San Diego, which we can speculate may be due to the mega-region’s strong R&D and manufacturing capabilities.
     
  3. East County is where music is made
    Two of the world’s most renowned musical instrument companies call East County home. Taylor Guitars, which has won the affection of musical talents including San Diego’s homegrown Jason Mraz, is located in El Cajon. This year marks the company’s 40th Anniversary. On MFG Day, tour goers were treated to a behind-the-scenes look at the company that employs more than 400 people in the region.

    The largest banjo manufacturer in the U.S. is headquartered in Spring Valley. Deering – The Great American Banjo Company, was another company San Diegans were invited to tour on MFG Day.
  4. San Diego flies above the rest in UAVs
    In May, San Diego was one of the first 12 communities in the U.S. selected to participate in the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership, which allows the region to compete for a pool of $1.3 billion to support the local manufacturing industry. The region was selected specifically for its expertise in aerospace manufacturing.

    On Friday, two very different aerospace manufacturers – Northrop Grumman and 3D Robotics - invited people to their respective locations to check out their innovations first had. Both of these companies have made a name for themselves for their work in the unmanned aerial vehicles field.
    In Rancho Bernardo, Northrop Grumman treated tour goers to a peak at its Unmanned Systems Center of Excellence, where spectators got to meet a very impressive 21-year-old engineer.

    In Otay Mesa, 3D Robotics showed off its indoor testing facility. The UAVs are assembled right across the border in Tijuana. At Friday’s panel, Guillermo Romero, a director with the company, spoke about the collaboration between his facilities on both sides of the border. His team can design a world-class UAV in San Diego, and manufacturer in Mexicali the same day.
     
  5. Manufacturers are hiring…and they pay well
    Manufacturing provides strong middle-class jobs to many San Diegans. With more than 2,900 companies in the manufacturing ranks, the industry represents about 8.7 percent of all jobs in San Diego, yet it accounts for 12.2 percent of all wages.

    One company that is looking to ramp up hiring is General Dynamics NASSCO. The shipyard is looking to bring on 1,000 new employees for jobs including welding and shipfitting. As Kevin Graney, vice president and general manager of the shipbuilder said at Friday’s panel, “If you can weld, come see me after.” The Barrio Logan company is committed to helping fill those jobs through apprenticeships and skills training.

    Community colleges, apprenticeships and other job training programs are vital assets as San Diego companies look to fill these vacant positions. As panelist Dave Klimkiewicz of the iconic Sector 9 skateboards said, “Not everyone needs to go to college, but everyone needs to live.” He talked about the need to bring back hands-on classes at the middle and high school level. Panelist Bob Cassidy of ViaSat also discussed the need to fill the workforce pipeline with more highly-skilled manufacturing technicians. 

August 14, 2014

Pharma MFG info

Selected by the US Secretary of Commerce as one of the 12 advanced manufacturing communities in the country, San Diego is on the forefront of helping to strengthen American manufacturing. Manufacturing supports more than 90,000 jobs throughout San Diego County. National Manufacturing Day on October 3 provides San Diego and Northern Baja manufacturers an opportunity to highlight to the local community and the country, the diverse products that are manufactured in our region.

So why should San Diego County care about manufacturing? Here are a few reasons:

  • San Diego County’s 2,909 manufacturers employ 94,445.
  • Manufacturing industry jobs pay on average $75,824 annually, compared to the average private employer at $53,778.
  • Manufacturing industry jobs pay about 41 percent more than the average private job.
  • The manufacturing industry represents about 8.7 percent of all jobs in San Diego and about 12.2 percent of all wages/pay.
  • The manufacturing industry contributes more than $7.1 billion in wages every year.

On Oct. 3, many San Diego and Northern Baja companies will open their doors to the public as part MFG Day, a national program that addresses common misperceptions about the manufacturing industry.  If you know a manufacturer in our region, encourage them to participate! Participants currently confirmed to host tours include: 3D Robotics, D&K Engineering and more. MFgday.com has the complete list.

Med-Device-mFGs

The tours will be preceded by a breakfast panel and discussion with leaders in the manufacturing industry at San Diego Central Public Library including California Manufacturers and Technology Association, 3D Robotics, CareFusion, General Dynamics NASSCO, Sector 9, and ViaSat. To register to attend, visit https://sandiegomfgday2014.eventbrite.com.

We hope to see you at Manufacturing Day, but if we don’t catch you there, you can still follow the conversation on twitter using the hashtag #MadeinSD. 

Manufacturing day is presented by San Diego City College CACT Program with additional sponsorship provided by D&K Engineering, Chase, Manpower, National University

Thank you to our media partner, San Diego Business Journal. 

#MadeinSD

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May 29, 2014

On May 28, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker announced the first 12 communities that have been selected to participate in the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership (IMCP). Joining forces with many partners across the region, San Diego is included in the Southern California Designation, which was led by a team out of the University of Southern California Center for Economic Development.

The IMCP program is an initiative designed to revolutionize the way federal agencies leverage economic development funds by encouraging communities to develop comprehensive economic development strategies that will strengthen their competitive edge for attracting global manufacturing and supply chain investments.

“The 12 Manufacturing Communities announced today represent a diverse group of communities with the most comprehensive economic development plans to attract business investment that will increase their competitiveness,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker. “IMCP is a critical part of our ‘Open for Business Agenda’ to strengthen the American manufacturing sector and attract more investment to the United States. Innovative programs like IMCP encourage American communities to work together to craft  strong, clear, strategic plans to attract manufacturing investment and jobs to transform themselves into globally competitive commercial hubs.”

So what exactly does this mean for San Diego and the Southern California region? As home to the world’s largest concentration of military personnel and with more than 80 percent of the state’s aerospace workers, the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership of Southern California Manufacturing Community (AMP SoCal) will concentrate on further transforming the aerospace and defense industry. Home to companies including Northrop Grumman, the Southern California region is positioned to be in the vanguard of  future avionics and aerospace industries.

Of course, you can’t become a leader in aerospace and defense without the workforce to get you there. Part of the strategy will involve a significant workforce training component that will partner with local colleges and universities to streamline certificate programs. The strategy also focuses on building a supplier network, research and innovation, infrastructure and site development. The strategy will also focus on creating an export acceleration workshop, which dovetails nicely into the Global San Diego Export plan, which was released in conjunction with the Brookings Institution this year.

On the local front, the partnership involves the City of San Diego, CONNECT, UC San Diego, Cleantech San Diego, San Diego East County Economic Development Council, San Diego Workforce Partnership and San Diego Regional EDC.

Following the success of last year’s MFG Day, on Oct. 3, many of the partners listed above will team up with local companies as they open their doors to the public to showcase an industry that supports nearly 90,000 local jobs. Stay tuned for more details.

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October 4, 2013

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Every San Diego company has a unique story to tell. That became very apparent as the region came together to celebrate MFG Day at San Diego City College on Friday. Four panelists representing a diversity of San Diego companies talked about the challenges and opportunities facing the region’s manufacturing sector, which employs more than 90,000 individuals.

Take D&K Engineering, a high-tech manufacturer.  When the entrepreneurs who created EcoATM were looking to make their idea a reality, they went to the Rancho Bernardo firm to create an e-recycling kiosk. As a result, D&K Engineering had to scale up its production and hire more employees. And they chose to do it in San Diego. “Access to talent and the border opportunities are one of the main reasons I chose to start D&K in San Diego. Besides, who wouldn’t want to live here?” said Alex Kunczynski, one of the company’s founders.

The border also adds a significant competitive advantage for local manufacturers. As Interim Mayor Todd Gloria said in his opening remarks, “this is a big deal.” San Diego and Tijuana are currently working together like never before. When asked about why Taylor Guitars chose to open up a manufacturing facility across the border in Tecate, VP of Manufacturing Chris Wellons said “We have a saying at Taylor Guitars. We say ‘We’ll we be happy we did this in 10 years.’” And happy they are. Manufacturing in Mexico, as opposed to China or somewhere else overseas, has given Taylor more control over its finished product. It’s also become more cost competitive.

Wellons alluded to the entrepreneurial spirit of another panelist. Stephan Aarstol started Tower Paddle Boards - a sports and active lifestyle company - in 2010. With a little help from ABC’s “Shark Tank,”he transformed his sales from $3,000 in 2010 to $3 million in 2013.  Although he only has four employees in San Diego, he plans on growing in the coming years, and he’s looking to do it in the region. To him, he’s not just selling a paddleboard but also exporting California culture to consumers all over the globe.

As Chris Wellons of Taylor Guitars echoed, keeping manufacturing jobs close to home really comes down to innovating the process. Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees, with many of them working out of its El Cajon headquarters. Although customers can still rely on the same quality that made Taylor a household name when it was founded in 1974, the manufacturing process has evolved. Taylor used to carve each of its guitar necks out of an individual piece of mahogany, meaning 60 – 70 percent of the materials were wasted. In 1999, Taylor decided that process needed to change. The result was one of the greatest guitar innovations in the past 100 years.  Instead of using a one-piece neck, Taylor switched to a three-piece neck, which resulted in a 66 percent yield in materials and created a more sustainable product. This, Wellons said, was possible because of the ability to execute a vision, which he thinks is a strength of San Diego.

So what can San Diego do to continue incubating manufacturing?

The answer may be easier said than done. San Diego is fortunate enough to have a highly-educated workforce. The metro currently ranks fourth in the U.S. for Ph.D. attainment rates.  Although Ph.D.-trained workers are essential for many San Diego sectors, as the panelists noted, it’s not necessarily these types of jobs they have trouble filling, but the machinist jobs where workers require hands-on manufacturing skills.

Wellons learned these skills in his high school shop class, and so did many other highly-skilled manufacturers. Admittedly, we focus a lot of time on retaining and incubating high-tech talent, but as Interim Mayor Gloria pointed out “These jobs are important too. They provide a comfortable middle-class life.” San Diego City College provided the perfect backdrop to get this conversation going. As San Diego Community College District Trustee Peter Zschiesche noted, 98 percent of San Diego City College grads remain in San Diego. 

With the guidance of San Diego Community College District and organizations like San Diego Workforce Partnership, San Diego – and it’s nearly 2,800 manufacturers – are looking to put these grads to work.

Of course, this all starts with the conversation we had this morning. A conversation that I’d bet we’ll be happy we had in 10 years.

Please check out MFGday.com for a list of local companies that held tours today,

Media Coverage: 

KPBS, Taylor Guitars still strumming along as example of San Diego manufacturing success

U-T, S.D. county product makers open doors to public

 

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