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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


Trade

October 16, 2017

Announced during a World Trade Center San Diego-led trade mission to the U.K., San Diego has officially become the first west coast city to join London’s city-to-city Business Welcome Programme.  The partnership program offers direct services and support required to scale San Diego and London-based companies looking to set up locations and do business in the partner’s metro area. This means that it will be much easier for San Diego companies to do business in London, accelerating company growth, trade and investment within both regions. 

At a time of shifting political ideologies and global uncertainty, trade partnerships help bring down borders,” said Nikia Clarke, executive director of World Trade Center San Diego. “San Diego and London have taken their success into their own hands and partnered on the City-to-City Business Welcome Programme to ensure continued economic progress.

In case you didn’t know, the U.K. is a vital trading partner for San Diego:

  • U.K.-based companies directly support more than 10,000 jobs
  • U.K. companies have poured more than $3.9B in greenfield investment (2003-2015) into San Diego’s economy
  • The U.K. is one of the top 10 largest export markets for San Diego-produced goods and services

As part of the official agreement between World Trade Center San Diego (WTC San Diego) and London & Partners, companies will have access to a suite of services. London-based companies looking to open shop in San Diego and vice versa can access reduced co-working spaces, legal consulting and access to a venture capital network and angels, facilitated by WTC San Diego.

SAN DIEGO TO LONDON LONDON TO SAN DIEGO
  • 1 month of free office space
  • Discounted Oyster card
  • Discounted accommodations
  • 3 months of free space at
    WeWork San Diego
  • Reserved spots in
    CONNECT’s Springboard
    and Capital Match Program
  • Access to discounted attractions

 

London & Partners, which acts as London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s official promotional agency for both business and tourism, launched the program in March 2017 to build a global network of cities that are collaborating to help businesses transition and grow from one destination to another. With this announcement, San Diego has become the first west coast city to enter the program. Other global cities in the program include Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam, Lisbon and many others pending agreement.

“London and San Diego are two cities that share a strong culture of business and innovation. We see a great opportunity to work with San Diego to establish greater trade and investment links and to help high-flying companies maximise the opportunities on both sides of the pond," said Tony Margiotta, project manager, city-to-city, London & Partners.  "The city-to-city Business Welcome programme is already helping businesses in cities all over the world to build their networks and expand internationally. We look forward to helping more San Diego companies make London their launchpad for growth into Europe and beyond.”

The announcement was made as part of trade mission, led by World Trade Center San Diego and Congressman Scott Peters (CA-52), to London and Cambridge from Oct. 16 -19. More than 20 senior level San Diego executives representing business, academia and government will be in the U.K. spur economic activity by creating new partnerships and opportunities. 

London businesses interested in setting up shop in San Diego can visit here to learn more.

San Diego businesses looking to tap into London’s network can learn more here or contact Jesse Gipe at jg@sandiegobusiness.org.

September 6, 2017

Amid global political gridlock and NAFTA renegotiations, talks on trade are booming more loudly than ever. At the forefront of such conversation is President Trump’s persistent push for U.S.-produced “Made in America” goods. While manufacturing remains a key component of the U.S. trade policy – accounting for 56 percent of total U.S. exports – Brookings’ newly released Export Monitor 2017 suggests a necessary shift in policy strategy. And counter to Trump’s strategy, regions like San Diego – where a growing share of exports are service-related – may reap the benefits.

Nationally, only eight of 35 major industries experienced export growth between 2014 and 2016, led by educational and medical services, management and legal services, commodities, travel and tourism, and the technology sector – noting a particular uptick in international attractiveness of U.S. universities and hospitals. That said, the report indicates that if current trends continue, services will surpass goods as the largest export category in 2020 within the 100 largest metro areas.

Taking a closer look at San Diego, a highly connected innovation economy, the report shows:

  • San Diego ranks as the 15th largest metropolitan region in the U.S. in terms of its GDP and the value of its real exports ($22.9 billion).
  • When comparing export intensity among the top 100 metropolitan regions, San Diego ranks 37th (9.9 percent) – this is up from 50th (10.03 percent) in 2014. 
  • A total of 134,350 jobs were supported by exports; 66,940 of which are direct jobs.

Manufacturing is an important part of San Diego’s economy and that will not change. However, With manufacturing exports on the decline and services exports on the rise, Brookings’ Export Monitor suggests challenges for President Trump’s “Made in America” agenda. The administration’s trade strategy cannot merely be a manufacturing strategy; it must also include promoting and expanding access for services exports. This means addressing barriers like physical presence requirements, local data storage mandates, temporary staff relocation restrictions, cross-border data flow constraints; it means continuing to confront discriminatory practices and offshoring, and technological advancement and workforce development that sustain regional competitiveness.

As an innovation economy, home to a world-renowned life sciences and defense ecosystem, services exports (think: IP) are among top priority in San Diego. And as the third most patent-intensive region in the world, connectivity to foreign markets – especially as it relates to sharing San Diego-made, life-changing technologies and discoveries with the rest of the world – and a balanced trade policy is make or break.

See more in Brookings’ full report, San Diego export scan and press release.

May 3, 2017

At 6pm on Monday, May 1, San Diego greeted Condor Airlines' first ever flight from Frankfurt, Germany. Condor begins seasonal, nonstop service between San Diego and Frankfurt with up to three flights weekly.
 
“Germany is one of San Diego’s most important foreign markets. By providing nonstop service to Frankfurt from San Diego, we’re opening new doors to global markets that will attract exports and lucrative foreign investment for the region,” said City of San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer.
 
As a key global partner to the San Diego region, Germany currently ranks fourth in terms of foreign employment (2015) and seventh in terms of total exports from San Diego (2013). 
 
Ringing in this new flight, more than 100 San Diego business and tourism officials joined WTC San Diego at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens - Liberty Station for a kickoff event this Tuesday. Attendees included San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer; Jens Boyd, group head of long-haul, Condor Airlines; April Boling, board chairman, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority; Greg Koch, founder and Chairman, Stone Brewing; and Consul General Hans Jörg Neumann, Consulate General Germany Los Angeles. Stone Brewing Co is the only U.S. brewer to fully own and operate a brewery in Europe. 
 
Besides Frankfurt, the service will provide travelers with convenient one-stop access to European destinations such as Paris, Vienna, Prague, Venice, Berlin, Rome, Zagreb and many more.
 
This year, San Diego International Airport will double its intercontinental routes. In addition to its current service to Tokyo, London and the new route to Frankfurt, it will also add a new flight to Zurich, Switzerland later this year. 
 
June 14, 2013
By Jennifer Storm
 
Breweries and biotech companies abound. Strong public/private collaboration. A modernized downtown. A breathtaking waterfront. Until I came back from Yokohoma, Japan last week, I thought San Diego was the only place where this existed.
 
I was representing EDC as part of the World Trade Center San Diego’s trade mission to Japan, along with BIOCOM and San Diego Regional Airport Authority, to learn about further strengthening ties between the two regions. Last week, I boarded a plane at Lindbergh Field. Nearly 12 hours later, on one of the most immaculate airplanes I have ever seen, I stepped foot in Narita Airport in Tokyo thanks to Japan Airlines' direct service. A few days and a bus ride later I found myself on the way to Yokohoma, Japan – San Diego’s sister city. 
 
From an economic standpoint, it’s an optimal time to launch flight service between San Diego and Japan. Much like the U.S., Japan is climbing out of recession. As such, they’ve adopted liberal spending policies – known as Abe-nomics –to spur investment and growth, so there is a strong potential for increased foreign direct investment .  
 
YokohamaWhile in Yokohoma, Japanese business leaders exhibited their strong interest in partnering with San Diego companies. We were met with a delegation of 40 business leaders who had ties to San Diego or were interested in creating them. The strong link between Yokohama and San Diego was very apparent- I even met the sole distributor of Stone Beer in Japan! 
 
Traveling to Japan also helped me put things in perspective back home. It’s amazing how two distinct countries could have so much in common, yet also have the opportunity to learn so much from one another. The infrastructure in Japan is outstanding. You can move from one place to another with absolute ease.  This is something we’re working on in San Diego, but admittedly, we’re just not there yet.
 
On the other hand, while touring a biotech company, I had the opportunity to chat with one employee who had previously spent time at the Salk Institute. He noted that although he prefers Japan on a personal level, he misses the creative freedom of working in the U.S.  If he discovered something while in his lab at Salk, he had the freedom to explore that opportunity, in the hopes that it would lead to further research. Although it varies from company to company, he echoed that Japan has more of a regimented work environment. 
 
Although each city has excelled in similar industries, we have a lot of lessons to learn from each other. After all, isn’t that what siblings are for?
 
To learn more about San Diego’s most recent business delegation to Japan, you can read Joe Panetta’s guest column in the U-T.